Tag Archive: friends


Social Media Creates Intimacy

Every time I hear someone talk about addiction to social media, rules they think others should use for cell phones, texting or on the job connections I think of Stefana’s talk.

Yes, there are limits, but maybe we are limiting our own beliefs of what we are capable of.

Amplify’d from profitablesocialmedia.com

I was walked up to a group of friends at an event last week and saw several gathered on a group of chairs and sofa in the hotel lobby… each with their smart phone out texting.

Disconnected?

Not really. The group had been together for hours, out to dinner and very good friends.. but each of them were taking a moment to check in the friends and family at home.

An Internet connection doesn’t replace face to face time.. but it can enhance it. Rather than the knee jerk reaction that we are losing intimacy, watch this video from TED speaker Stefana Broadbent: How the Internet enables intimacy

Read more at profitablesocialmedia.com

 

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I love this term.. irrational as it may be.

“Planned Spontaneity”

It may sound like “getting around to procrastinating” or “busy on my day off” but I think it points to a desire most of us share. We want to be spontaneous, can’t really plan it, but can use these new tools to “organize on the fly”

Have you tried “planned spontaneity?”

Amplify’d from www.customerthink.com

For consumers, knowing where they are and what’s / who’s around them is the key to planned spontaneity.  That’s about to get a whole lot easier, as geo-location becomes a key feature of social networks and web apps from existing providers adding location information:

  • Geomium takes data from local review sites and combines it with social information to not only allow users to both see which of their friends are nearby, but also to find nearby event and venue information and deals.

  • LikeOurselves lets individuals quickly create a mobile group and locate members within 20 miles of their location, enabling on the fly meetups

  • FastSociety is a New York-based startup aimed at simplifying communication between friends on-the-go. The service is SMS-based, and groups last between 3 hours and 3 days, increasing the spontaneous nature of the offering.

Read more at www.customerthink.com

 

I love this term.. irrational as it may be.

“Planned Spontaneity”

It may sound like “getting around to procrastinating” or “busy on my day off” but I think it points to a desire most of us share. We want to be spontaneous, can’t really plan it, but can use these new tools to “organize on the fly”

Have you tried “planned spontaneity?”

Amplify’d from www.customerthink.com

For consumers, knowing where they are and what’s / who’s around them is the key to planned spontaneity.  That’s about to get a whole lot easier, as geo-location becomes a key feature of social networks and web apps from existing providers adding location information:

  • Geomium takes data from local review sites and combines it with social information to not only allow users to both see which of their friends are nearby, but also to find nearby event and venue information and deals.

  • LikeOurselves lets individuals quickly create a mobile group and locate members within 20 miles of their location, enabling on the fly meetups

  • FastSociety is a New York-based startup aimed at simplifying communication between friends on-the-go. The service is SMS-based, and groups last between 3 hours and 3 days, increasing the spontaneous nature of the offering.

Read more at www.customerthink.com

 

I haven’t read the source and admit I’m uneducated on Dunbar’s assumption that our brains can only handle 150 relationships.

No matter how he comes up with that number.. he didn’t include all the tools we have today.

Let’s stipulate that we are using a new defination of friendship. There are limits to how many people we can spend time with in person.. but so what?

When I get a tweet from a Twitter friend I talk to every day who says “I hope we get to meet some day” I’m a bit confused.

“Didn’t we meet last year?”

“No, I mean “in person”

“Yes, that would be nice.. but would be be closer friends?”

Amplify’d from www.nytimes.com

Put simply, our minds are not designed to allow us to have more than a very limited number of people in our social world. The emotional and psychological investments that a close relationship requires are considerable, and the emotional capital we have available is limited.

Indeed, no matter what Facebook allows us to do, I have found that most of us can maintain only around 150 meaningful relationships, online and off — what has become known as Dunbar’s number. Yes, you can “friend” 500, 1,000, even 5,000 people with your Facebook page, but all save the core 150 are mere voyeurs looking into your daily life — a fact incorporated into the new social networking site Path, which limits the number of friends you can have to 50.

Read more at www.nytimes.com